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Reforming Disability Living Allowance 2010 to 2014/15 - Some more detail

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John
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There are many welfare changes in the budget 2010. We also must wait for new welfare reforms to be announced prior to the governments "Spending Review" due 20th October 2010.  Plus there will be two finance bills, one to follow the budget and another in the autumn.

I single out Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and will cover the budget in more detail and add a link when I have completed my analysis.

So what is planned for Disability Living Allowance.

All benefits will have there 'indexation" (the amount of yearly increase) tied to the Consumer Prices Index (CPI).

In the "Red Book<" it says - 

"1.103 The Government will reform the Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to ensure support is targeted on those with the highest medical need. The Government will introduce the use of objective medical assessments for all DLA claimants from 2013-14 to ensure payments are only made for as long as a claimant needs them."

However "digging deeper" in the additional supplementary material and the "Budget Costings Document or Policy Costings Methodology"< proffers more insight into how they plan to do this.

"Reforming Disability Living Allowance 

Measure description 

 

This measure will introduce an objective medical assessment and revised eligibility criteria for both new and existing working-age claims for Disability Living Allowance, to be rolled out from 2013/14. The assessment will follow a similar process to the Work Capability Assessment (WCA) used for claims to Employment and Support Allowance, with a points based system to assess eligibility to the different rates of the benefit. 

 

The cost base

 

This costing uses the same caseload and expenditure projections used in the main social security forecast. 

 

Costing

 

Drawing on the evidence of the impact of the WCA, the central assumption for this policy is that it will result in a 20 per cent reduction in caseload and expenditure once fully rolled out. It is assumed that existing claimants would be reassessed over three years, with 25 per cent of the caseload reassessed in the first year, 75 per cent by the end of the second year and 100 per cent by the end of the third year.

 

Table 1 – Direct Exchequer impact (£m) 

                             

Exchequer impact:

2010-11    £ 0

2011-12    £ 0

2012-13    £ 0

2013-14 +£ 360 (million) saving.

2014-15 +£ 1,075 (million or just over £1billion) saving."

 

So the plan is to reduce the bill for Disability Living Allowance by £1 billion by 2014/15.

 

With EVERYONE currently in receipt being re-assessed within 3 Years of the programme starting we await the start date. Though we must await the welfare reform measures.

Mary (not verified)
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On reading this tread about reforming DLA, I notice that it said  existing working-age claims for Disability Living Allowance, to be rolled out from 2013/14.

Does this mean if you have reached retirment age that you will not have to be put through this new assessment

Diane (not verified)
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your question is a really good one, because that is what I thought

 

 

John says "thanks for posting Diane, agree"

Terry Duerden (not verified)
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mary

I have asked John this question again because he does not seem to have answered your question.

Terry

anonymous (not verified)
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Gentleman aged 68, replacement hips, dicky heart, has just had DLA completely removed. Lives in rural area in what was once sheltered housing.                         When he moved there, there was a warden, who lived on the scheme.and was able to help the elderly and disabled. No longer.Wardens removed. Now just a 'support worker' who pops in couple of hours a week to tick a box or two...ie resident still alive... Scheme is situated on top of a hill, he cannot walk down hill to village shop. Needs car.   Now he cannot afford it..

 

 

John
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There are a few issues here.

Has the DLA decision been fully appealed?

Depending on the time and orginal award it maybe that replacement hips have changed the orginal reasons for awarding the DLA. Though clearly you indicate a "dickie heart" and that coupled with other health issues need to be fully appraised. I know of a wheelchair based colleague who is currently challenging the withdrawal of there DLA and its important to challenge if you believe you still have the same degree or increasing need for care and mobility assistance.

It is common place alas that not only are Sheltered Housing Schemes becomming thin on the ground and expensive accordingly alas with local councils facing a reduction in central grant funding it would seem that this along with other social service provision will become yet more scarce.

Age UK  be able to help.<

Also it may be a good idea for this gentleman as well as his peers to form a residents association or forum so that they can be a collective voice when if comes to housing related matters.

John
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Mary, we have to wait for the Welfare Reform measures that the DWP will be releasing prior to the Spending Review, as mentioned.

Those who receive Disability Living Allowance/Attendance Allowance should expect a regular review of their entitlement to this benefit.  We know that the previous government and DWP set a "goal" of a regular review , at least once in every 5 years.  The DWP also randomly select DLA and other benefits for review all the time. On that basis you should expect a review at sometime.

If the criteria and testing changes then when you are reviewed you would be subject to current process and regulation. As it stands at the time.

Typically, those who apply over the retirement age do so and receive Attendance Allowance.

There is an anomaly here though.

If you are, currently, 64 years and 11 months old and apply for DLA and get it. You continue to receive if post retirement age. If you are 65 years and 1 second old when you apply you will do so for Attendance Allowance.  What happens if you are still working post retirement age? I would speculate that this anomaly maybe dealt with in the aforementioned welfare reform that is coming. Will DLA automatically "roll over" in future to Attendance Allowance at the state retirement age?   

We started because of issues about DLA and the review a few years ago.

Of course when we have clarification we will publish it promptly.

Thank you for taking the time to post your comment. You raise a key issue. I know the APPG Disability< will take a lead on this issue and I will raise this when given an oppourtunity.

 

John.

Terry Duerden (not verified)
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John I have left another posting on this and you do not seem to answer Marys question on this one. I ppressume logically that Mary is now on DLA. What she is asking is if in 2003 she is 65 will she have to have the medical?

If you could respond please?

kevin
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kevin
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Plans to introduce medical assessments for disability living allowance claimants, announced in today's Budget, may not reduce the benefits bill, as intended.

The proposal, unveiled today by chancellor George Osborne, will be introduced for new and existing claimants from 2013 and is designed to save £360m in 2013-14 and £1,075m in 2014-15.

However, the Office for Budgetary Responsibility, set up by the coalition to scrutinise public spending and taxation, identified disability benefits as one of three areas where the impact of policies announced today by Osborne were uncertain.

Currently, DLA claimants must complete a 59-page form and submit supporting medical evidence for their claim.

In his speech to the House of Commons, Osbourne said the proposed assessment would be "a simple process rather than the complex forms [disabled people] have to fill out at the moment".

However, Mark Shrimpton, deputy chief executive of disability charity Radar, said: "They are making a gut reaction but they have no understanding of what the real impact will be."

Shrimpton added Radar could not support yet another assessment regime arguing there should be a single point of access to all benefits. He said: "Neither the taxpayer nor disabled people should support these multiple, expensive, exhausting and unnecessary burdens of bureaucracy."

Neil Coyle, director of policy at Disability Alliance, said it was "highly likely" that the assessment used would be the much-criticised work capability assessment, which is used to determine eligibility for employment and support allowance, the replacement for incapacity benefit.

Coyle said the WCA was "generating significant concern for its inability to recognise the impact an impairment or health condition has on a disabled person's life".

Osborne said three times as many people claimed DLA now as 10 years ago.

However, Rich Watts, director of operations at the Essex Coalition of Disabled People, responded on his blog, Arbitrary Constant<, that this reflected the fact that more disabled people were living independently than in residential care. He said "effectively cutting DLA risks reversing this rise in independent living".

Osborne also announced that housing benefit will, from April 2011, be paid to disabled people requiring an extra room to support a carer.

He also promised that full proposals on welfare reform will be announced by October this year, when the government publishes its spending review, which will set out public expenditure limits for 2011-12 to 2014-15.

Related articles

Incapacity benefit claimants to face 'flawed' work assessment<

Welfare: Coalition to pursue controversial plans<

Coalition expected to keep disabled back-to-work programme<

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2010/06/22/114776/Medical-assess...<

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anonymous (not verified)
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I was assessed by a DLA tribunal, their decision was to award me DLA for an indefinite period of time..hence I havent had a review in the 7 years I have recieved the award. how will this affect me?

Dean (not verified)
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Hi, This has got me very worried, I`m on morphine along with other drugs to help push back the pain that I`m in. I`m worried that I won`t get a fair medical and loose what I now need to support my independance. I would of thought that excisting claiments would of been left out of this, and to bring in the new process for all new claiments. IMHO this is going to course many disabled people many worrying nights.

It`s not a good place to be in the first place, being disabled, I always feel grateful that I`m being supported and able to have some kind of life with the help of my fellow man, but there is always that feeling that at some point in life, the help I now get will be snatched away from me and I am unable to have much of a life afterwards.

DLA works well for most people that have real problems and if tampered with (2013) will send some to their graves through worry.

John
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I commented on the award of DLA for an "indefinite period of time" back in March 2008. To me it was a surprise then that this change had happened to DLA.

"A few years ago legislation was introduced that changed all claims from "for life" to "an indefinate period". As I understand it currently that means a review at least once every 5 years though still trying to clarify that one. Basically the govt want to be able to review all benefits at some point in time." 12th March 2008.

If you have not been reviewed thus far you are fortunate. The way to view this is that your award had no "set" time before review. Many are awarded for 3 years by which they must apply again.  So some awards are "time limited" some are not.

Dean, yes I am also extremely worried. I have to say that it was the last government that removed the protocol that protected existing claimants of benefits. This pulls a useful point in that there is no political gain in pursuing the "protection of existing claimants" point you make as both Government and opposition are in agreement here.

Pain is a big issue for many disabled people, regardless of specific condition. This can mean strong pain medication including opiate's such are morphine, we have "oramorph" in the fridge, but I digress. There are side effects and of course operating machinery or making any key life decision is not recommended when you are on it.  This also creates a barrier to work in itself before you discuss the pain issues. I do understand the implications here.

I know all on DLA appreciate the support of others through the State.  Yes many will be worried.  I don't want to worry further but the whole idea of this website borne out of the DLA review a few years ago was to give information.  I don't expect that this will be the end of the "bad news". I await the new promised Welfare Reforms due before October and then of course there is the "Spending Review".

Thanks for your comment Dean.

I cannot urge or stress enough the need for people to write or go and see there MP and get involved in campaigning. No charity campaigning here has the same power as individuals taking action. Its the personal engagement and experiences related to those in "Power" that matter the most.

YOU (that's whoever is reading this) really must start to raise your issues directly. For our part we believe in sharing information. It encourages others and creates an evidence base. If you write or speak up or start challenging please keep us informed.  I am happy to publish your experiences with your consent.  

The reason its important for charities to be "in the loop" of what you do. The Work & Pensions Select committee for example often calls for evidence. You can submit this personally and I would encourage you to do so. However if you are not comfortable to do so let us know. I will keep you anonymous but ensure, where relevant, your experience is included.

nick (not verified)
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This whole budget has sent me spirilaling, i know its a long way off and should have nothing to worry about but just added grief, panicing and worried..

anonymous (not verified)
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i will be 65 in 2013 and i om on dla and have been due to a car accident 18 years ago. Will i have to have the assessment in 2013?.

John
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Nick there will be opportunities for you to get involved and share your concerns.  I would encourage you to write to your local MP or go and see them in there weekly surgery. 

I must remind people that the migration of Incapacity Benefit to Employment and support allowance starts in October this year. So the process of being  examined starts for many then.

On the anon posting about retirement age please scroll back up as you are the third person to mention this valid point.

Thanks for your comments.

Terry Duerden (not verified)
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Hi

You wrote to anon on this subject and recommended that they scroll up to a previous answer to the same question. I have scrolled up and there is nothing.

I am indefinate DLA mobility seere arthritis, spondolosis, severe degenerative disk disease etc etc. Have never ever scrounged and work from home designing extensions etc.

Will I have to have an examiination again?

The last medical I had the doctor was brilliant and told me to go back to my own doctor get xrays and they would never ever touch me again with the xray evidence. This I did and xrays are on file together with consultants letters.

 

I must admit I am worried now that they will stop my DLA and I will have no means of getting about in my retirement.

I am contacting a local politician about this terrible situation. 

kevin
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Terry hi,

We know from the stastitics published by the DWP that 3,145,970 claim Disability Living Allowance (November 2009) , unfortunately I am unable to list the main disability conditions like that as presented under the Attendance Allowance http://benefits.tcell.org.uk/forums/learning-disabled-care-worse< .

I have tried to answer your question from a different perspective: Looking at the age limitations of both AA and DLA. I did find a report by Counsel and Care and other listings offer similiar information, which says.

"If you are 65 or over and are ill, and/or disabled, you can claim Attendance Allowance. If you are nearly 65 you should claim Disability Living Allowance and not wait to claim Attendance Allowance, as Disability Living Allowance is a more generous benefit and continues beyond the age of 65 (see section 2)."

http://www.firststopcareadvice.org.uk/downloads/resources/1524.pdf<

http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/disability-living-allowance-dla/dla--resources<

http://www.judicialappointments.gov.uk/static/documents/00420_roleplay_dla_aa_guide.pdf<

Kevin

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Terry Duerden (not verified)
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Hi Nick

Thanks for your reply

However, it still answers a totally different question, that of not being elligible to instigate a claim if you are 65 or over. I am nearly 61 and am claiming the benefit as such it normally continues past 65. My question is quite simple. I will be 65 in 2003 so will still have a year left until retirement age. Are they going to put me through another medical and run the risk to me of loosing my dissability benefit?

This question has no link to not being abole to start a claim if you are 65 or over.

Sorry to be a pain but the answer given does not seem to me to have any relevance.

Terry Duerden

John
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Terry, not sure if this was posted in error let me know john@tcell.org.uk< and I will delete it. However to try and answer the point you make.

1) All benefits can be reviewed by the Secretary of State for the Department for Work and Pensions at ANY time.

2) You question is about a future event, 4 years hence. NO ONE will be able to give you a definitive answer because we can not know what Welfare Reform Laws will be passed between today and in 4 years time.

3) We can say, given the situation as it stands today. That the Department for Work and Pensions, under the policy direction of the previous government, was to regularly review all benefits. You could be reviewed tomorrow, next week, next month, next year or in 6/10/20 years time, some are never reviewed.

4) Under the law as it stands today. If you claim DLA today and you are reviewed when you are 67. If that review supports your entitlement than you would continue to receive DLA, subject to the 3 aforementioned points.

These are the questions, issues we all live with unfortunately.  The way forward it to raise these issues with those in power. I know that the All Party Parliamentary Group on Disability always brings up the level and degree of beaurocracy we all have to go through.

John
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Of some concern is that earlier today, in the Budget response, the Shadow Chancellor, agreed on the need to reform Disability Living Allowance.

When there is consensus in the Commons like this it makes the need to mount a serious challenge and campaign even more urgent. They may slightly argue on the finer detail. But we really need to tell those that represent us what our lives are like and the benefits we appreciate and how they keep us independent.

kevin
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People with learning disabilities, mental health problems, autism and fluctuating health conditions could be at increased risk of hardship under coalition plans to restrict access to disability living allowance, experts have warned.

Plans in yesterday's Budget to save £1,075m from the DLA budget by 2014-15 by introducing a medical assessment for existing and new claimants could see about 360,000 of the existing 1.8m working-age adults lose eligibility. However, the government's own budgetary watchdog said the precise impact of the change is uncertain.<.

The medical assessment will be introduced in 2013, replacing a system where most people access DLA through a self-assessment form, backed by supporting medical evidence.

The Department for Work and Pensions said it did not have details of how the assessment would work but there are concerns it could be similar to the controversial work capability assessment.

This determines whether people receive jobseeker's allowance and are required to seek work, or are given employment and support allowance (ESA), which is worth £25 a week more and involves more support. However, campaigners have warned that many people have wrongly been placed on jobseeker's allowance after being has deemed fit to work.

Gary Vaux, head of money advice at Hertfordshire Council, said around 70% of new claims for ESA were being refused through the work capability assessment, and that if this example was followed with DLA, many people could be denied payments.

He said that those most at risk included people with mental health conditions, those with fluctuating conditions such as multiple sclerosis, or people with learning disabilities.

Esther Foreman, Mencap's campaigns and policy manager, also raised concerns.

She added: "Strong safeguards must be put in place to ensure that people with a learning disability, who desperately need the support, do not miss out because of these assessments."

The National Autistic Society (NAS) warned that the changes may exclude people affected by autism from the support they need, as had happened through the work capability assessment.

Chief executive Mark Lever said: "We know that many people with autism currently encounter huge problems with the medical assessment for out of work support. We want to work with the new government to ensure this doesn't happen to DLA."

Carers UK also voiced concerns about the shift, citing the fact that carers' eligibility for carer's allowance is based on the person they care for receiving DLA or attendance allowance.

Chief executive Imelda Redmond said a "poor medical assessment could spell financial disaster for carers and their families".

She also raised concerns about the government's plan to save £6bn a year by indexing most benefits to the consumer price index (CPI) measure of inflation rather than the higher retail price index (RPI) measure.

She added: "Making savings in this way will hit the incomes of some of the most vulnerable people in our society particularly hard, people who are already struggling to make ends meet."

Vaux said that had carer's allowance been indexed to the CPI rather than RPI over the past decade it would be worth £48.64 rather than its current level of £53.90 a week.

Related stories

Unison: Osborne 'declaring war' with pay freeze<

Social care budgets could be slashed by a third, say experts<

Medical assessments for DLA claimants 'may not save cash'<

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2010/06/23/114783/dla-cuts-set-t...<

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kevin
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Plans to cut housing benefit in yesterday's Budget risk increasing homelessness and demand for social services, experts have warned.

Chancellor George Osborne announced plans to claw back £1,765m a year from housing benefit, known as local housing allowance (LHA), by 2014-15.

Measures include capping payments at 30% of the level of local rents, rather than 50%, increasing LHA in line with the consumer price index measure of inflation, rather than the higher retail price index, and chopping the benefit by 10% for those who have been on jobseeker's allowance for more than a year.

LHA will also be capped for each property size, with a maximum of £400 a week for a four-bedroom property.

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation warned that some families could find themselves forced into "poor quality, overcrowded housing" in areas where private rents were high, such as London and the south east.

Shelter chief executive Campbell Robb said: "We are really concerned that even at current levels nearly half of local housing allowance claimants are already making up a shortfall of almost £100 a month to meet their rent.

"If this support is ripped out suddenly from under their feet it will push many households over the edge, triggering a spiral of debt, eviction and homelessness."

Robb added the Budget had failed to address the central point of "the critical shortage of affordable housing".

Jenny Edwards, chief executive of Homeless Link, warned that the homelessness charities faced a "perfect storm", if housing benefit cuts drove increased homelessness at a time where charitable donations were falling and councils were making cuts to Supporting People budgets.

Martin Cheesman, joint chair of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services' housing network, said that the caps could potentially put a significant additional cost on to temporary accommodation budgets and make it more difficult for councils to get landlords to take homeless people as tenants.

Welfare rights consultant Neil Bateman said the changes were unlikely to reduce the welfare bill because the reforms did not look at the root causes of housing benefit claims, such as lack of work skills, high housing costs and low pay.

Bateman warned: "Any increases in poverty and joblessness and housing stresses directly impacts on the demand for social care support. We have this constantly with governments that they cut housing benefit but then don't factor on additional costs of increased homelessness."

Related stories

DLA cuts set to hit learning disabled and mentally ill<

Medical assessments for DLA claimants 'may not save cash'<

Social care budgets could be slashed by a third, say experts<

Unison: Osborne 'declaring war' with pay freeze<

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2010/06/23/114784/housing-benefi...<

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kevin
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In response to the Government’s intention announced today in the budget to medically assess new and existing claimants on Disability Living Allowance from 2013, Liz Sayce, Chief Executive of RADAR comments:

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John
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Thank you for letting me know there was an issue with this page last evening.  I will deal with this with our ISP.

John
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Rodeo Drive Kid (not verified)
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Hi Everyone,

 

Along with everyone else here, I too was quite alarmed about the changes to DLA. I think most of the people on this thread have probably already gone on the web to read all the news about this, and have started to feel really depressed. I am writing to put things in perspective and to make some people feel better.

First of all, between now and 2013, they may change their minds when the practicalities of this come to their attention. If they do go ahead, I do think that they probably won't exclude people on indefinite DLA if they review cases because the vast majority of claimants are probably in that category already. I think while we may all have reason to be worried, many people who receive DLA are severely disabled, and this will become apparent when to the medical assessors when they see you. Sure, they will try and lay off as many people as necessary, but for a lot f people, the changes may not be too drastic. You may not lose it altogether because anyone assessing you would be able to see that the claimant really needs the help. I think we are panicking because it makes us feel insecure, but I think we should let it all roll and see what they come up with. In the end, no matter ow much we rely on the State, the sad fact is that they don't really owe us anything, and they could abolish benefits altogether, if they so choose. We do have a right of entitlement due to the current legislation, but legislation changes, and so does the generosity of the governments. I think the problem is that it is always free money from the point of view of the public. Anyone who gets free money in our society is viewed with suspicion and derision. I think this is why DLA claimants are always going to have a tough fight. They would constantly need to show why they should be getting free money!! I know it is not free money but people resent it, and the government needs to show that they are tough on benefit fraud because it gets votes in when time comes to appeal to people's prejudices during campaigns. They can bail out banks with billions, yet the people who elect them get royally screwed on a regular basis. I am optimistic that most people will be able to get through this test and not lose entitlement. The fact is, all of us who got it went through hell to get it. There was no question left as to why you were getting it. They don't like giving out money so obviously they only gave t to the ones who they couldn't realistically refuse, and I think we will get it back. It took us a long time to prove our cases. Indeed many of us had appeals, saw doctors, and had to fight for it, but the reason we got it is because they could see that in most cases it was necessary. They will learn this again. 

I say, let us be strong and confident, and let them bring in any tests they want.

anonymous (not verified)
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I have just been assessed by DWP doctors for DLA so the process is in place already! My case is probably because I have come from Spain where my disabilty startedand havecome back to my country for help and support from my family and have been told that my award was for life. I would just like to say the assessment is no trouble if you have a genuine disability you have nothing to worry about. Some folks are on DLA short term some folks are not genuine and this will be why the government are changing some of the legislation. My only question in this will I have to be assessed again or once assessed by doctors that's it done?

kevin
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DWP has announced that, as part of the new Government’s welfare plans, the Work Focused Health Related Assessment (WFHRA) is to be cancelled from July 2010. This is apparently due to the planned new ‘Work Programme’, which is intended to "offer an integrated package of support, providing personalised help for people who find themselves out of work, regardless of the benefit they claim".

DA believes the Government needs to clarify its plans as soon as possible in order for the responsibilities of DWP, Jobcentre Plus staff and people seeking or receiving benefits are clear.

More information

http://www.disabilityalliance.org/wfhra.htm<

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John
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On the points of state retirement age, currently in receipt of DLA and any further medical test. I did answer the question I am afraid though it may not be the answer wished for.  I said in my response to Mary  - "Mary, we have to wait for the Welfare Reform measures that the DWP will be releasing prior to the Spending Review, as mentioned.". Until the details of the reforms are announced no one is able to give you a definitive yes or no answer, much as I would want to.

Terry, thank you for the action you are going to take. It personally motivates me and you set an example we all need to follow. It does matter what you say in your own words.  If in a MP's weekly mailbag of 200 letters over a 100 are on the same issue, it cannot be ignored. If in a weekly MP surgery of 30 people 20 are raising the same issue again it gains momentum. Relying on 3rd parties, charities and us, we can only do so much. We don't provide standard letters because they don't cover the key component of your experience & worries, your words can only do that. I however would ask, where you are happy, to send me a copy. I will use it when I need to submit responses to consultations and will keep your details confidential unless you consent otherwise.

Rodeo Drive Kid. I admire your attempt to make a positive contribution but I don't share it. I am cynical not just because I am subject to the benefits myself but involving myself more closely than most I am more than aware of the problems of not being concerned here.  To save £1 billion the eligibility criteria will change.  HIV in this case  is highly stigmatised but has relatively few people claiming. The training for DWP staff and Atos is poor this may be due to the high cost of providing proper training for few people - a Cost/Benefit exercise. Though many will face discrimination. Yes DLA is a benefit will little fraud. But government can change the criteria and even take whole illnesses out of being eligible and typically this will be those less willing to put up a fight. At the core of this is the need for people to take control and responsibility for there own circumstances. Make sure your doctors, especially specialist have your full medical history for example. Don't rely on the DWP to just approach your GP for a medical report, submit medical reports from your consultants, another example. Most of the issues with the last review were Decision Maker errors. Many who "rolled over" and accepted a downgrade of there DLA are likely to loose more this time.  The ought to have challenged but I do understand the "fear of public" exposure stigma argument here. Unfortunately this fear is a vicious cycle that makes life difficult because we don't stand up.

Yes I do hope there will be an movement to send a message to government on this issue. I hope the "apathy" is finally overcome. I hope many will not just comment to online forums on this subject but also write and email the "people in power".

Looking at the type of society the UK wants to present to the world it is one of being "Civilised" and ensuring the vulnerable are looked after as a moral imperative. To do so it needs to also act in this manner. I don't see the "free money" argument in this case. Not only is the taxpayer looked after by the measures taken to ensure the benefit is given to those that need it. Some in receipt of it were the very tax payers until disability forced them to give up or made them unable to work.

Anon, the only "award for life" for DLA is typically one undertaken through the DS1500 route as you are not reasonably expected to live more than 6 months. Several years ago the award "for life" was change to "for an indefinite period", this done by a Statutory Instrument changing it for all recipients.

For all can I just make it clear. Both the last and current government policy is to be actively looking to regularly review any benefit claim. To think you will not ever be subject to a review is not true anymore and hasn't been for some time.

One must also remember that case law is continually being made when it come to all benefits.  This can change understanding very quickly for the better or worse. Benefit law is extremely and highly complex given the nature of so many different statutory laws with changes made by statutory instruments and case-law. This can make definitive answers difficult.

We need to see what the new Welfare Reforms will bring to answer many of the ongoing questions we all have. 

Thank you all for the points you have raised, I really appreciate it.

Alan (not verified)
Mary's picture

Your post on DLA is most interesting and thankyou for it.

However, you refer at one stage to the assessment of all claimants and recipients of working age, and later on to ALL claimants.

So do you happen to know how this would affect me as a 70 year old man who has been in receipt of the allowance for some 14 years. Will I and others like me have to suffer a re-assessment?

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