Skip to main content
6 replies [Last post]
kevin
kevin's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/03/2009

Towards a second Commission communication on combating HIV/AIDS in Europe and the neighbourhood 2010-2014

http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_overview/health_forum/docs/ev_20090121_co0...<

n/a
anonymous (not verified)
anonymous's picture
anonymous (not verified)
anonymous's picture
anonymous (not verified)
anonymous's picture

The EU members are discussing a new directive for equal treatment of disabled people in Europe. This is a great opportunity to include the design of manufactured goods. Neither the DDA nor the new Equality Bill give disabled people rights to accessible products. The UK Government are opposing this opportunity.

There is a second issue. A new law is being negotiated that would significantly improve the rights of disabled people across the European Union when using buses and coaches. It would lead to mandatory training of transport staff (including bus drivers) and better information provision. The UK Government is trying to weaken the proposals.

We need you to tell Prime Minister Gordon Brown how important accessible goods and buses are for you.

We’ve joined forces with Sense, Leonard Cheshire Disability, RNIB and RNID. Go to http://campaigns.sense.org.uk/ea-campaign/clientcampaign.do?ea.client.id%20=150&ea.campaign.id=5567#email< where you’ll find the link to our campaign, and a form to email Gordon Brown.

http://www.radar.org.uk/radarwebsite/tabid/272/default.aspx<

kevin
kevin's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/03/2009

Huge disparities between Western and Eastern Europe in tackling the AIDS virus mean the HIV crisis in the region is far from over, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said Wednesday. Skip related content<

The U.N. health body said the rapidly rising rates of new HIV infections in countries such as Ukraine, Moldova, Estonia and Latvia meant the region as a whole now had worlds the fastest growing epidemic.

"While HIV epidemics in Western Europe are, with some exceptions, generally stabilising, in many countries in Eastern Europe, they rage out of control," Andrew Ball of the WHO's HIV/AIDS department told an international AIDS conference in Vienna.

"The rate of increase of new HIV infections in Europe is now the highest in the world."

Most of the increase is due to the spread of the virus among injecting drug users in places such as Russia and Ukraine, where addicts are often stigmatised and have limited access to HIV treatment or information.

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS is spread in blood, breast milk and through sex and drug users can spread it by sharing used needles.

In the WHO's European region, which covers around 50 countries in Eastern and Western Europe, as well Central Asia, there were more than 1.2 million HIV cases by the end 2008, with more than 100,000 new infections in that year.

"The AIDS crisis in Europe is not over," said Martin Donoghoe, the WHO's program manager for HIV/AIDS in the region.

He said that while the annual number of new HIV cases was relatively stable at about 20,000 in Western Europe, rates were volatile and increasing in the east, where there were 80,000 new cases in 2008.

The United Nations children's fund UNICEF said Monday that an "underground HIV epidemic" in Eastern Europe and Central Asia was being fuelled by drug use<, risky sex and severe social stigma that stopped people asking for help.

Donoghoe said a specific focus was needed on injecting drug users, a group which in some areas accounts for 50 percent of all those living with HIV. In a large number of countries in the region, drug users are stigmatised and excluded from health and social services, including HIV treatment, the WHO said.

The number of people in Europe who get AIDS drugs has doubled from 2003 to 500,000 in 2008. But Donoghoe said the vast majority of those new patients were in the west. In Eastern Europe, only around 23 percent of people who need HIV/AIDS medicines can actually get them.

Donoghoe said breaking and ultimately halting the fast growth of HIV in Europe would require "concerted action" by all governments and health organizations. "HIV in Europe depends on access to services in the east," he said.

http://www.hivscotland.com/index.php?controller=Default&action=NewsDetai...<

n/a
kevin
kevin's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/03/2009
Survey
 
Sigma Research has just launched EMIS - the European gay and bisexual men’s sex survey which incorporates the UKs Gay Men's Sex Survey also known as Vital Statistics. The survey will be available to complete in 25 languages, until 31st August 2010.<
 <
The overall funding for EMIS comes from the European Commission. With a target sample of at least 60,000 gay men and bisexual men EMIS will be the largest survey of this population ever undertaken anywhere in the world. Researchers and gay and HIV organisations from 31 European countries are working together to ensure EMIS is a success.<
 <
The questionnaire is about sex, health and relationships. It is anonymous, safe, and relatively short (it takes about 15-25 minutes to complete). Taking part might mean you find out something new and the information you provide will help health promoters to better meet the needs of gay men and bisexual men. A high response rate will also help us send a signal to governments that HIV and sexual health are still very important.<
 <
In the UK, EMIS is part-funded by Terrence Higgins Trust on behalf of CHAPS. CHAPS is the national HIV prevention programme funded by the English Department of Health. In the UK many of the CHAPS partners and more than 50 of the largest and most important gay and HIV organisations are working with Sigma Research to promote the survey.<
 <
We have no influence on the results of the survey – but you would do by taking part. We believe it will help gay and bisexual men across Europe to improve their sex lives and reduce the harm that can come from them, including reducing new HIV infections. As soon as the results are available, we will let you know.<

https://www.demographix.com/surveys/3Y9Q-VHRX/37XLDP3J/?sigmahome<

n/a
anonymous (not verified)
anonymous's picture

Public consultation with a view to a European Accessibility Act

Objective of the consultation

The Commission is reflecting on the development of a European Accessibility Act containing measures to improve the accessibility of goods and services in the European market. This consultation is part of the preparatory data collection that will underpin the assessment of the impact of the measures.

Target group(s)

All citizens, including persons  with disabilities and older people, enterprises and organisations of public and private sector as well as civil society in EU Member States, EFTA/EEA and candidate countries.

Period of consultation

  • Opening date: 12 December 2011
  • Closing date: 29 February 2012

How to submit your contribution?

The consultation is published on the Commission consultation website "Your Voice in Europe". The consultation site is accessible and follows web accessibility standards.

Response to the consultation can be submitted online by clicking here<.

The questionnaire is available in English. The questionnaire is also available in document format and can be requested for reasons of accessibility.

Reference documents and other, related consultations

Public consultation with a view to a European Accessibility Act - background document< pdf - 35 KB [35 KB] .

Contact details

  • Responsible unit: "Rights of persons with disabilities", Directorate-General Justice, European Commission
  • E-mail: just-d3-consultation@ec.europa.eu<
  • Postal address: Directorate-General Justice, European Commission, rue Luxembourg 46 01/13, B-1049 Brussels, Belgium.

Results of consultation and next steps

A report summarising the main outcomes of the public consultation will be included among the documents accompanying the eventual European Accessibility Act.

Data protection

The policy on "protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Community institutions" is based on Regulation (EC) N° 45/2001< of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000. 

http://ec.europa.eu/justice/newsroom/discrimination/opinion/111207_en.htm<

X