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Attendance Allowance - Statitic's and Data

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kevin
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Figures for attendance Allowance as at Novemeber 2008 - DWP

 

Attendance Allowance - all entitled cases Caseload (Thousands) : Main Disabling Condition by Gender of claimant

 





  Total Gender of claimant
Female Male
Caseload (Thousands) Caseload (Thousands) Caseload (Thousands)
Total 1,751.37 1,196.72 554.65
Main Disabling Condition 535.72 419.64 116.08
Arthritis
Muscle / Joint / Bone Disease 94.58 71.18 23.41
Blindness 57.85 39.07 18.78
Stroke Related 111.06 60.91 50.14
Learning Difficulty 2.62 1.39 1.23
Mental Health Causes 166.29 116.15 50.14
Epilepsy 4.13 2.47 1.66
Deafness 4.42 2.80 1.62
Malignant Disease 30.72 15.03 15.69
Chest Disease 69.92 36.98 32.94
Back Ailments 35.73 24.02 11.72
Heart Disease 137.99 83.78 54.21
Parkinson's Disease 33.36 15.52 17.84
Diabetes Mellitus 31.29 17.88 13.41
Renal Disorders 5.23 2.27 2.97
AIDS 0.05 0.01 0.03
Skin Disease 0.91 0.57 0.34
Frailty 243.17 174.68 68.49
Multiple Sclerosis 2.44 1.80 0.63
Other 183.88 110.56 73.32
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DEFINITIONS AND CONVENTIONS: "-" Nil or Negligible; "." Not applicable; Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest ten; Some additional disclosure control has also been applied. Average amounts are shown as pounds per week and rounded to the nearest penny. Totals may not sum due to rounding. 
SOURCE: DWP Information Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study. 
Notes:
Caseload (Thousands) Totals show both the number of people in receipt of an allowance and those with entitlement where the payment has been suspended, for example if they are in hospital. 
Main Disabling Condition Where more than one disability is present only the main disabling condition is recorded. "Other" includes 25 medical conditions. 
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anonymous (not verified)
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A review of the default retirement age, which allows employers to compel staff to retire at 65, is to be brought forward by a year, the government says.

BBC home editor Mark Easton said ministers had effectively signalled an end to the default retirement age.

The majority of people retire before 65, but 1.3 million people work beyond state pension age. Many more say they would if their employer permitted it.

The employers group the CBI said the move was "disappointing".

The review had been expected in 2011 but will now take place next year.

Ministers said they had brought the review forward to respond to changing demographic and economic circumstances.

Explaining the change in the timing of the review, Prime Minister Gordon Brown said: "Evidence suggests that allowing older people to continue working, unfettered by negative views about ageing, could be a big factor in the success of Britain's businesses and our future economic growth."

Economic recovery

The TUC welcomed the move, with general secretary Brendan Barder saying: "It cannot be right that an employer can sack someone simply for being too old.

"Employees should have choice - neither forced by employers to give up work, nor forced by inadequate pensions into working longer than they should."

However the business group, the CBI, said: "Having a default retirement age helps staff begin the process of deciding when it is right to retire, and helps firms plan ahead with more confidence."

It added that its research had suggested that 81% of those who asked their employer to keep working had been allowed to do so.

Pensions Minister Angela Eagle said both employers and employees would be asked their views.

"Our own research shows that many more people wish to work a little bit beyond retirement, and perhaps wind down their working lives rather than have them abruptly cut off, and I think that as a society that's something that we need to consider," she said.

'Discriminatory'

Separately, the Court of Appeal will hear a legal challenge to the default retirement age this week in a case backed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

A solicitor, Leslie Seldon, believes he was discriminated against on the grounds of age when he was not permitted to work beyond the age of 65. He says he needed to go on working to support his family.

Dinah Rose QC, acting for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, says the hearing will raise "important questions of policy and principle".

A number of age discrimination cases are waiting in the pipeline for the outcome of this and another challenge being brought against the government by the charity Help the Aged and Age Concern next week.

The organisation welcomed the news, but said it would still press ahead with its planned judicial review of the original legislation, adding that many older people wanted to work past the age of 65.

"The workforce is changing very rapidly, there are fewer school leavers coming into the labour market, and more people in their fifties and sixties," said the charity's Andrew Harrop.

"We all know about the problems this country faces with pensions, and the best way of solving that is to encourage people to work a few years longer. It's good news for employers and for the economy, for people to stay on in work into their sixties."

The Liberal Democrats said that the default retirement age should be scrapped as soon as possible, saying that making it illegal to discriminate against someone because of their age, except if they were over 65, was "typical new Labour fudge".

"Ageism needs to be stopped, full stop," said Work and Pensions spokesman Steve Webb.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8148188.stm<

anonymous (not verified)
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Until his heart failure last year, Brian Windles was "a strong pair of hands" for his wife Patti, who has arthritis and lung-related problems. But when Brian was unable to help with the housework, the Windleses realised they needed help. Without any savings or high enough needs to qualify for social services support, they considered selling their home in Walesby, Lincolnshire, and downsizing to free up money to pay for help.

Following advice from Age Concern and Help the Aged, they instead began claiming £70.35 a week attendance allowance for Brian earlier this year. The social security benefit is a universal entitlement that does not depend on where a person lives and provides cash that can be spent on services older people< want, to meet extra costs associated with disability< and old age. This could include paying someone to do the housework or gardening, or to go grocery shopping, or taxi fares to get to the shops.

"It gives you that feeling of being a bit more in control," says Brian. "You feel better because it takes a weight off your shoulders."

Attendance allowance is £47.10 or £70.35 a week, depending on need, and paid to 1.6 million people in Britain aged 65 and over. Yet the social care< green paper, launched earlier this month, suggests converting attendance allowance into some kind of means-tested social care grant administered by councils.

"In developing the new system we think that there is a case for drawing some funding streams together to enable us to deliver the new and better care and support system we want to create," says the green paper.

It continues: "We think we should consider integrating some elements of disability benefits, for example attendance allowance, to create a new offer for individuals with care needs."

The argument for ditching the allowance is that it is not means-tested and duplicates the local government social care assessment and grant process. The Department of Health argues that the current system is fragmented and complex to understand, access and administer. "To meet the challenge of more people needing care, we want to target public money as effectively as possible," says a DH spokesman.

"Whatever the outcome of the consultation [which runs until November], we want to ensure that people receiving any of the relevant benefits at the time of reform would continue to receive an equivalent level of support and protection, under a new and better care and support system," he adds.

However, campaigners argue that attendance allowance is vital to help older people stay independent and well for longer. Michelle Mitchell, charity director for Age Concern and Help the Aged, explains: "That extra bit of help may help prevent, or delay the need for more formal care." Receipt of attendance allowance can also make people eligible for additional support as higher rates of means-tested benefits and entitlements can be dependent on carers receiving it.

The RNIB is alarmed at the prospect of attendance allowance being scrapped because its clients – often defined by councils as having moderate or low care needs – could lose out entirely.

Gladys Humphries, 82, from Lowestoft in Suffolk, is blind and cares for her husband James, 83, who has severe Alzheimer's disease. Her attendance allowance not only pays for taxis for hospital appointments but opened the door to pension credit and council tax benefit, resulting in an extra £150 a week. If it were scrapped she would lose all this money and would not be able to care for her husband, since she would not qualify for a social care grant.

Gladys cannot understand why the system should change. She says: "I would say to the government, put yourself in my position and see how you would cope without the extra money. Please, please think again before you do anything."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/jul/29/attendance-allowance-support<

 

kevin
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Attendance Allowance - all entitled cases Caseload (Thousands) : Main Disabling Condition by Gender of claimant





  Total Gender of claimant
Female Male
Caseload (Thousands) Caseload (Thousands) Caseload (Thousands)
Total 1,787.49 1,214.55 572.94
Main Disabling Condition 572.70 444.95 127.75
Arthritis
Muscle / Joint / Bone Disease 105.37 80.38 24.99
Blindness 63.67 42.93 20.74
Stroke Related 115.84 63.09 52.75
Learning Difficulty 2.56 1.35 1.21
Mental Health Causes 187.68 129.55 58.14
Epilepsy 4.48 2.65 1.84
Deafness 7.90 5.19 2.71
Malignant Disease 39.62 18.80 20.82
Chest Disease 77.44 40.55 36.90
Back Ailments 42.88 28.63 14.26
Heart Disease 154.24 92.28 61.96
Parkinson's Disease 36.64 16.60 20.04
Diabetes Mellitus 36.15 20.27 15.88
Renal Disorders 9.01 3.97 5.04
AIDS 0.07 0.02 0.05
Skin Disease 2.16 1.35 0.81
Frailty 194.45 141.72 52.74
Multiple Sclerosis 2.56 1.87 0.68
Other 132.04 78.40 53.64
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kevin
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kevin
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kevin
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Attendance Allowance - all entitled cases Caseload (Thousands) : Main Disabling Condition by Gender of claimant





  Total Gender of claimant
Female Male
Caseload (Thousands) Caseload (Thousands) Caseload (Thousands)
Total 1,791.92 1,212.29 579.63
Main Disabling Condition 578.52 447.65 130.87
Arthritis
Muscle / Joint / Bone Disease 108.48 83.02 25.46
Blindness 64.46 43.36 21.10
Stroke Related 116.11 63.01 53.10
Learning Difficulty 2.46 1.27 1.19
Mental Health Causes 192.73 132.44 60.28
Epilepsy 4.51 2.63 1.88
Deafness 9.08 5.99 3.09
Malignant Disease 42.31 19.93 22.38
Chest Disease 79.28 41.33 37.96
Back Ailments 46.12 30.70 15.42
Heart Disease 155.78 92.59 63.18
Parkinson's Disease 37.19 16.75 20.44
Diabetes Mellitus 36.64 20.57 16.07
Renal Disorders 10.44 4.61 5.82
AIDS 0.08 0.03 0.06
Skin Disease 2.69 1.73 0.97
Frailty 164.30 120.92 43.38
Multiple Sclerosis 2.55 1.86 0.69
Other 138.19 81.92 56.27
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DEFINITIONS AND CONVENTIONS: "-" Nil or Negligible; "." Not applicable; Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest ten; Some additional disclosure control has also been applied. Average amounts are shown as pounds per week and rounded to the nearest penny. Totals may not sum due to rounding.
SOURCE: DWP Information Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.
STATE PENSION AGE: The age at which women reach State Pension age will gradually increase from 60 to 65 between April 2010 and April 2020. This will introduce a small increase to the number of working age benefit recipients and a small reduction to the number of pension age recipients. Figures from May 2010 onwards reflect this change. For more information see http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/espa.pdf<
Notes:
Caseload (Thousands) Totals show both the number of people in receipt of an allowance and those with entitlement where the payment has been suspended, for example if they are in hospital.
Main Disabling Condition Where more than one disability is present only the main disabling condition is recorded. "Other" includes 25 medical conditions, including "Obesity" from February 2010 (for claims to benefit from October 2008 onwards) Previously, "Obesity" was included within "Mental Health Causes".

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